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Own your cleavage in the office girlfriend!

This blog post has been guest-written by Alison Vella from Student Musings.

So I recently entered the corporate world.

If I thought hiding my knockers was a problem before I was out of my flipping mind.

Working in an office where tees and ripped jeans violate dress codes makes choosing an outfit an almost impossible task. It’s like having another limb to think about – an awkward protrusion to hide because some bloke decided it was inappropriate flesh to flaunt.

It’s not a nightclub, you don’t want to be cat-called, or hit on or compared to Kat Dennings.

You don’t want to be intellectually reduced by the size of your chest but you don’t want to look a clumsy frump either.

That’s the challenge of corporate dress. How do I, a young professional, stay on trend without compromising my bust?

I have looked high and low for work-wear solutions but the more I look the more disheartened I become.

Shirts make buttons pop, blazers make the top heavy resemble boxes and pinafores are so restrictive they may as well be damn corsets.

Being uncomfortable in your clothes is alienating. It adds weight to your already heavy chest and makes you so self-conscious that you have to hunch. As a person whose back aches from the experience, I am determined to make sure no woman’s physical and mental well-being is ever compromised by her breasts again.

Here are six tips to get you sitting up straight and kicking goals at work:

Opt for lower necklinesOpt for lower necklines:

I know it sounds counterintuitive but high necklines aren’t the answer to workplace cleavage. They create a dreaded wall of boob drawing attention to your breasts rather than deflecting it. I suggest you wear tops with a modest round or v-neck instead. The open expanse of skin between your neck and bust create the illusion of smaller breasts and highlight your dainty décolletage.

 

Try to balance out your figureTry to balance out your figure:

Big boobs can make the best of us look like bloody funnels. A-line dresses and skirts balance the hefty weight of our chests, creating an hourglass silhouette as spicy as Sofia Vergara’s. They draw attention to our waists so we don’t walk around looking like human marquees.

 

Wear darker colours on top
Wear darker colours on top:

I’m all about colour but loud prints up top invite eyeballs. Ruffles, thick frills and shiny sequence have the same effect so steer clear, look for basic tops in dark colours and pair them with bottoms as exuberant as you are.

 

Choose finer and softer materialsAvoid adding bulk to your upper half:

Chunky knits and double-breasted coats add volume to your upper half. They swamp your curves and make you look far larger than you are. Choose finer and softer materials that stretch instead – you’ll feel far more comfortable especially if you’re sitting in an office chair all day.

 

Always try something on even if it is a basic tee:

I was so excited when I found out I got the job. I filled a cart with 14 items on ASOS – I waited a week for them to arrive and when I tried them on I looked horrendous. Shirts gaped and dresses were so tight I could hardly breath, it was soul crushing.

Save yourself shipping those suckers back to the factory and try things on before you buy them. Breasts make shopping unpredictable; you can’t assume something will fit you based on the numbers sewn onto a tag.

Lastly, make sure you are wearing the right bra:

There is no use doing any of the aforementioned things if you aren’t wearing the right bra. Double boob, under boob or fat the splatters from a tight back band will compromise your outfit. Get fitted first.

You should never be ashamed of your body and you should never see your breasts as a limitation. We are here to support your career not just your breasts – power to you ladies!

 

Alison VellaAlison Vella – a girl’s girl, a travel enthusiast, a sport fanatic and a cafe connoisseur. She lives by the moto “be brave, take risks, nothing can substitute experience” and freelance blogs to support her studies in media and communications.

Read more at https://studentmusings.com

 

 

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